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How can demand/supply side policies help variety of people?

How should the government implement demand/supply side policy to help corporate leaders, unemployed workers and retired people? The government should utilize the policy that both stabilizes the inflation rate and lowers the unemployment rate to help all of these people. There aren’t any absolute solutions to these problems all simultaneously, yet there are always ‘best’ solutions.

The government could nullify the labor union’s power and make the wages flexible. By lowering to wages to an apt level, there will be surplus of money that can be used to employ a number of people. Also, the money that’s left could be used to increase the pension of the retired people. People who were employed will be angry, however, it’ll give them a strong sense of job security by looking at numbers of people coming in.

In order to protect the working population from the inflation, the government should implement the monetary policy in order to cut down money supply. By cutting down money supply, it’ll significantly decrease the inflation rate  to stable state. Also, the government could increase the interest rate in order to curb inflation.

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What Greece must do to Survive the Debt Crisis

A frustrated Greek expressing his angry through violent protest

CNN News: Click Here

In action to fight off the increasingly unbearable debt crisis, Greece chose to get financial support from both EU (mainly Germany) and IMF. This might help Greece out of the problem in a short-run, yet they still have to pay back the money they have borrowed from EU and IMF. Now all Greeks must tighten their belt in order to fight off the crisis. There is a list of what Greece must to do recover their economy.

  1. Salary Cuts
  2. Retirement
  3. Increase in Taxation
  4. Reform in Pension System

First of all, all Greeks (at least public workers) will increase a cut in their salaries. Salaries are one of the big factors that take up large percentage of the cost in business and government spending. Though this will arouse some violent protests from the people, there is no other way to fight off the debt crisis without a cut in wages.

With some cuts in wages, many business and governments will want to minimize the number of employees as possible to decrease the money spent. This will result in early retirement of many workers with ages over 60. This will also contribute to the high unemployment rate, however, significantly cut the unnecessary budgets.

Interestingly, the Greek government decided not to have an early retirement for its workers but to increase the retirement. The retirement age was shifted from 61 to 65. It may be that Greece government didn’t want more unemployment and more protests regarding it. I think that the Greece government is tightening the payment of wages so much that they don’t need to cut down its workforce.

Greek people will most definetly exprience the rise in taxation. Greek government said that it was going to raise all VAT’s by 10%. Increasing taxation is one of the key ways that Greece can endure the crisis.

Greeks will also exprience a cut in pension. Unplanned pension system was the main culprits for the cause of Greece’s debt crisis. The government borrowed money, unplanned, in order to fulfil its populistic policy of pension system. The system supported too many people and gave out excess amount of money. So many aged Greeks will exprience this frustrating cut in their pension.

In sum, these were the actions that Greece must implement in order to survive the debt crisis. I think that the government’s determination to get out of the deb crisis is firm, but I think that this determination is not supported by lots of Greeks. Greek people must bear in mind that if they don’t start tighenting their belts, the government’s effort in order to get out of the crisis.

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Analysis of Greek Economy in Debt Crisis

Probability of  Countries Being Unable to Pay Back Debt

BBC News: Article 1

BBC News: Article 2

European Commission has announced that Greek economy would shrink by 3% this year due to its high risk of defaulting.

As illustrated in the graph, Greek’s probability of defaulting has passed 50% and is heading for 60%. At this rate, Greece will most definitely default if there are no strict cut-offs on government spending and European countries to aid Greece.

Other countries in Eurozone fear for Greek’s economic crisis might affect Eurozone severely. As a result of Greece’s high CDS, it is badly affecting Euro.

“The euro hit its lowest level against the dollar in more than a year, at $1.2887, and was also down against the pound, with one pound worth 1.1706 euros.”

EU economic and monetary affairs commissioner Olli Rehn describes Greek economic crisis as a “bush fire” and that “it must be contained” in order to prevent it to become a “forest fire” putting Eurozone at risk also.

Accordingly, EU and IMF has promised immediate aid and bail-out package for Greece’s debt crisis. However, there are many doubts about how the bailout package could help the Greek crisis.

“The problem is no one has a clear idea of how we’re going to get out of this situation,” said Julian Callow, chief Europe economist at Barclays Capital.

What will happen if Greece defaults? Last post, I have explained about the consequences of defaulting. First, the Greek currency and possibly Euro will experience hyperinflation and it will be a no better than a piece of toilet paper. Second, as the currency Euro is affected, this will affect the taxpayers in the Eurozone, forcing them to carry the some parts of Greek burden. If this is sever enough, it could mean the dissembling of the Eurozone.

So, what are the actions Greece is taking to fight this problem? Well, first is that they have asked help from EU and IMF, which helped them pay their short-run bills. Secondly, they have announced to cut their governmental spending from more than 10% to 3% by 2012.

It was a wise choice to ask for a bailout package, however, if Greece fails to recover from this debt crisis, it means that they’ve just added another debt to their already unbearable- debt list.

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The Right to Life – Germany

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a) The opportunity cost of treating the leukemia patient is that you cannot treat other patients who would have high chance of surviving.

b) The opportunity cost of not treating him would be you could treat other patients who have high chance of survive.

c) It can be justified in an economic point of view. The opportunity cost is way more beneficial than treating the patient.

d) This is a typical case in a sense that you have to make choices that has best utility.

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