Posts tagged default

Analysis of Greek Economy in Debt Crisis

Probability of  Countries Being Unable to Pay Back Debt

BBC News: Article 1

BBC News: Article 2

European Commission has announced that Greek economy would shrink by 3% this year due to its high risk of defaulting.

As illustrated in the graph, Greek’s probability of defaulting has passed 50% and is heading for 60%. At this rate, Greece will most definitely default if there are no strict cut-offs on government spending and European countries to aid Greece.

Other countries in Eurozone fear for Greek’s economic crisis might affect Eurozone severely. As a result of Greece’s high CDS, it is badly affecting Euro.

“The euro hit its lowest level against the dollar in more than a year, at $1.2887, and was also down against the pound, with one pound worth 1.1706 euros.”

EU economic and monetary affairs commissioner Olli Rehn describes Greek economic crisis as a “bush fire” and that “it must be contained” in order to prevent it to become a “forest fire” putting Eurozone at risk also.

Accordingly, EU and IMF has promised immediate aid and bail-out package for Greece’s debt crisis. However, there are many doubts about how the bailout package could help the Greek crisis.

“The problem is no one has a clear idea of how we’re going to get out of this situation,” said Julian Callow, chief Europe economist at Barclays Capital.

What will happen if Greece defaults? Last post, I have explained about the consequences of defaulting. First, the Greek currency and possibly Euro will experience hyperinflation and it will be a no better than a piece of toilet paper. Second, as the currency Euro is affected, this will affect the taxpayers in the Eurozone, forcing them to carry the some parts of Greek burden. If this is sever enough, it could mean the dissembling of the Eurozone.

So, what are the actions Greece is taking to fight this problem? Well, first is that they have asked help from EU and IMF, which helped them pay their short-run bills. Secondly, they have announced to cut their governmental spending from more than 10% to 3% by 2012.

It was a wise choice to ask for a bailout package, however, if Greece fails to recover from this debt crisis, it means that they’ve just added another debt to their already unbearable- debt list.

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Greek Bonds are Useless Junks says Standard & Poor’s

BBC News: Click Here

According to BBC News, global stock markets tumbled after Greece’s debt was downgraded to “junk” by rating agency Standard & Poor’s over concerns that the country may default.

As uncertainty of whether Greece will get financial support from EU and IMF to clear up its looming debt increases, many rating agency such as Standard & Poor’s has rated Greek bonds as junks, rubbish.

What does it mean when a rating agency says that now Greek bonds are ‘junk’? It means that it is now very risky to invest on. It is mainly because of Greek’s apparent lack of ability to pay its bills. So there is a higher chance that an investor will lose money for investing in a country falling into the abyss of ever increasing debt.

Greece’s finance ministry said in a statement that the downgrade “does not correspond with the real data of the Greek economy.” Greek finance ministry denies that the down-rating doesn’t reflect the real Greek economy, however, this incident showed investor’s distrust toward the Greek economy.

If Greece does not take action to reduce debt and get help from the EU and IMF, it may default.

What’s default and what happens if a country defaults?

Lets look into what the definition of default is. Default is simply announcing that you cannot pay the debt in the due date. It doesn’t mean that the government will go bankrupt and the debt wouldn’t go away. The debt will always be there and the investors/lenders will demand you to repay the debt whenever possible.

What are the consequences of a country defaulting? There are several effects to this. First of all, the currency of the country becomes a rubbish or a paper tower (or no better than a paper tower). Foreign investors will have distrust against the currency of the defaulted country and the value of the currency will drop significantly. As the value of the currency goes down, it makes the imported goods insanely expensive, which will lead to inflation and shortage of necessary goods. If a country has high food dependency on importing, many people will starve to death as there are simply shortage of food due to expensive importing.

People will loose confidence and the recession or more like disintegration of economy will be in a vicious circle. So by this stage, there is ultimately nothing a country can do to recover. So Greece should get help from EU and IMF quickly by giving them confidence that they can pay back the borrowed money.

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