Posts tagged data

Democratic Republic of the Congo

The 10 Poorest Countries of the World: Hottez

Republic of the Congo is one of the very poor countries in the world. In fact, many people believe that this country might be the poorest country in the world. The blog Hottez has ranked the Congo as top number 1 in the most poorest country in the world.

The GDP per capita is $300 (2010 est.) and the GDP is $22.92 billion (2010 est.) which is the 119th in the world. Despite its large land (2,344,858 sq km) and large population (70,916,439) the GDP is quite small.

Population growth rate is 3.165% which is high. The data for unemployment rate is not available. It may be because that there are so many people in poverty and jobless. The life expectancy is only 54.73 years for the whole population.

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Data Response Section 4 Reflection

I have got the score of 20 out of 20. I have answered to every question asked and I think that this was the reason why I have got the perfect score. However, there were some improvements to be made. Firstly, my hand writing was not that neat. It would frustrate the examiner who might be grading 100-200 papers a day if the writing illegible. Also, I finished 15 minutes before the test ended. I think that I should be used this time to examine and correct on some of the mistakes I have made.

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Data Response – Measuring National Income

1. Explain whether you agree or disagree with each of the following:

(a) You have just read in the news that GDP in your country increased by 4% this year over last year. You therefore conclude that the quantity of output produced increased by 4%.

  • I agree with the statement under the condition that there weren’t any inflation or deflation. If the inflation/deflation rate was 0% that year, the quantity of output has increased by exact 4%. However, if there were inflation/deflation, then the ‘actual’ quantity of output will be different.

(b) In the early 1990s, following the collapse of the Soviet Union, many eastern European and former Soviet Union countries experienced negative net investment for a period of time. This means there was a drop in their stock of capital goods.

  • I disagree with this statement. Negative net investment does not mean that there was a drop in stock of capital goods. Instead, it means that the rate of increase in stock of capital good has dropped.

(c) If a government wants a measure of its population’s income per capita it should use GDP per capita; if it wants a measure of the quantity of output produced per capita it should use GNP per capita.

  • I disagree with this statement. GDP per capita cannot be used to measure the population’s income per capita. They are different index. GDP per capita means the average amount of stuff one can produce and this does not necessarily mean the person’s income. Income per capita could be lower than GDP per capita. For example, you do not earn $10 dollars by selling $10 CD album. Instead, you earn money (income) from the margin. If you spent $5 to make that CD album, then your margin is $5. So the income per capita does not necessarily the same as GDP per capita.
  • If one wants to measure the quantity of output produced per capita then they should use GDP per capita, not GNP per capita.

(d) GDP per capita is a better indicator of a country’s welfare than total GDP, because it calculates the amount of output produced per person in the population.

  • I agree with this statement. Even if a country has $10 trillion as their GDP, like India, lots of people are under abject poverty. India’s GNP, instead, is way lower than its GDP. GNP is a better way of calculating a country’s welfare.

(e) The average American is 12.5 times richer than the average Russian, since US GDP per capita is 12.5 times greater than Russian GDP per capita, based on the dollar–rouble exchange rate. (The rouble is Russia’s national currency.)

  • I agree with this statement. GDP per capita could be used to compare wealth of individuals in two separate countries. However, there is one flaw to GDP per capita. It is the unpredictable exchange rate. If rouble gets weak against a dollar, then GDP per capita of Russia could go lower. In converse, if it gets strong, its GDP per capita will increase. So if two countries had a similar (10-20% difference) of GDP per capita, then it will be hard to compare the individual’s wealth in those countries.

2. Compare and contrast the problems involved in measuring economic growth and measuring economic development. (10 marks)

  • We should be clear in the definitions of two separate economic terms. Economic growth indicates the growth in GDP of a nation, normally, and economic development includes improvement in standard of living. Economic growth can tell you how an economy has grew in a country, however, the economic growth doesn’t necessarily lead to improvement of economic development. To say there was an economic development, there has to be several factors considered: life-expectancy rate, literacy rate, GDP per capita, and more.

3. Explain three possible limitations of using GDP as a measure to compare welfare between countries. (10 Marks)

  • First, nominal GDP’s do not calculate inflation/deflation rate. So, it is limited in comparing welfare between countries.
  • Second, exchange rate could alter the GDP of countries, therefore, it is limited in comparing welfare between two countries.
  • Third, GDP does not include other activities such as illegal drug dealing or NGO activities. This could have large portion of a country’s GDP. For example, the illegal drug dealing has 20% of US GDP.

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Reflection on Data Response

For this Data Response, I got 20 out 20. I think that diagrams and graphs were crucial in the data response. I have labled the graphs appropriately and had apt explanations for the graphs. I think that is how I got an unusually high score. However, there was one drawback of my data response. My handwritng was too illegible. The IB grader might have been angry when he/she was grading me. So, I thought that I had to improve my handwriting so that it easy to write swiftly, but it is illegible to the grader.

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Data Response: Trees

What are the external costs/benefits of trees?

(a) (i) Negative externality are the bad effects that are suffered by a third party when a good or service is produced or consumed.

(ii) Positive externalities are beneficial effects that are enjoyed by a third party when a good or service is produced or consumed.

(b) Graph 1: Negative Externality of Tree Branch

Branches falling in a neighbor’s yard could be considered a negative externality looking at several points. If branches from trees fall in a neighbor’s yard, the neighbor would have to take his/her time to clean the branches up. Many business people think of time as money. The time the neighbor has to take to clean up the branches could be converted to a monetary value. Also, the ‘labor’ of cleaning up the branches also could be converted to a monetary value. In addition, if a neighbor suffered psycologically by the constant falling of branches from his/her neighbor tree can be conpensated by money. However, many ‘modest’ or ‘ordinary’ neighbors would not complain about it fearing the relationship with his/her neighbor could get bad. As it is illustrated in the graph, the time, labor, and psycological suffering of falling branches is not reflected in the graph. So this falling of branches from the nieghbor’s tree could be considered a negative externality.

(c) Graph 2: Government Intervention to Stop Negative Externality

Government could intervene if a neighbor complains to the local authorities about this annoying branches. A government could put a tax on a neighbor’s tree for having these ‘significant’ negative externalities and put a curve of MPC up to MSC in the graph 1. Or, the government could persuade the neighbor to cut down trees or clean up the branches him/herself and move the curve of MPB down to MSB in graph 2.

(d) If a government taxes on the neighbor for the falling of branches, it eventually lower the number of branches falling on the poor neighbor’s garden, however there are some drawbacks. The neighbor getting taxed would have monetary loss for his/her tree’s wrongful acts. To explain this graphically, in the graph 1, the number of branches falling decreases, however, cost of branches falling increases. Therefore, it is hurting the neighbor of the wrongful tree. However, if the government persuades the person to either cut down trees or clean up the branches him/herself, it will both let both neighbors to benefit. The owner of the tree can still keep the tree and the neighbor would not have to suffer from the branches falling of the tree. As illustrated in graph 2, it both lowers the cost and quantity of falling branches. So the best way for the government to do is to persuade the owener of the tree to clean up the branches falling off from the trees.

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Data Response: Clean Coal

(a) (i) Negative externality occurs when the production or the consumption of a product creates external cost to the society. For example, consumption of cigarettes can result in high possibility of cancer and air pollution.

(ii) Welfare loss occurs when there is a negative externality in the market. There is a loss of welfare when this negative externality is not reflected in the price mechanism.

(b) Graph 1:

Coal fired power stations produce negative externalities such as air pollution and acid rain. As you see in the graph, external costs of air pollution and acid rain are not reflected on the price. The production of electricity by usage of coal should be on the curve MSC, which rightfully reflects the negative externalities of the production. Instead, the curve is on MPC, which does not reflect the negative externaltities. Therefore, this engenders the welfare loss which is colored black in the middle of the graph.

(c) Graph 2:

In order to solve this problem, the government must intervene to overcome this market failure. The best solution to overcome this problem is for the demand for such polluting energy to go down. As you see in the graph 2, as demand goes down, the product becomes much cheaper and the consumption lowers down lessening the negative externalities of air pollution. The government could advertise not to excessively use the energy produced by the coal. However, this sometimes this method would not work. If this method does not work, government should use the last method of taxation on the production of the electricity by coal. This method is less-desirable than the first method. Although the consumption goes down, the price for the electricity goes up. So this would hurt the consumers.

(d) If the government taxes on the power stations producing electricity by coal, it will raise the price up from P1 to P* in the graph 1. This method will hurt the consumers. However, if the government tries to persuade the consumers to lower their consumption of electricity by advertisement, it will both lower the price of the electricity and the consumption. The best way for the government is to persuade the consumers not to consume electricity too much. The method of taxation should be considered as a last resort.

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Reflection on the 3rd Data Response

I thought I did very well on this Data Response, but I got a 5 for IB grade. For the first question, I did fairly well, however, I missed out some of the points that IB wanted. For the second question, it was a disaster. I have mistaken PED graphs for YED graphs, this was the major reason why I did so poorly on this Data Response. Next time, I think I should practice diagrams more before the test.

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